You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ category.

A quick update to let you know that if you want to discover all my 22-Day Revolution posts, I’ve now collected them all in one handy-dandy page, which you can view here: https://foodfashfit.com/the-22-day-revolution/

20140803-231657-83817228.jpg

(St Ives Grab Bag, Modalu (past season) / DKNY 4109 sunglasses, c/o sunglasses-shop.co.uk)

One of the specialties of the south of France is pastis, an aniseed liqueur which is usually diluted in chilled water and consumed as an aperitif. Pastis grew in popularity following the ban of absinthe and anise in 1915 – bartenders would concoct their own blends of a similarly tasting tipple and offer these illegal drinks under the bar to enthusiastic customers.

20140803-231655-83815547.jpg

Read the rest of this entry »

Come and visit me at my new home, foodfashfit.com! All of the content from this blog, and my cycling blog, can be found there, along with all my new posts on food, fashion and fitness. I look forward to seeing you there!

Tops - Marie Fleece Wrap Cardigan

People Tree cardigan

People Tree cardigan

Week Six : Lemons
Weird story – up until I tried this recipe, I didn’t like lemon in sweet things. Hated it. Thought it was weird. Maybe it was thanks to the dodgy lemon meringues that were knocking around when I was a kid, but I just couldn’t understand why people liked lemon in sweet things. Now I’ve been converted by lemon posset, I realise that it’s just that I don’t get on with the supersweet, barely tart kind of lemon puddings. I like my lemon desserts sharp and creamy! I’m not saying this isn’t sweet – it is – but it’s balanced by the sharpness of the lemons perfectly. I can say all this because it wasn’t me who invented it!

The recipe is supposedly based on a medieval dish of milk curdled with wine or beer, with spices added to it. The alcohol would curdle the milk, which was supposed to be a great cure for things like the cold. Even today, we drink hot milk to get to sleep, so I guess it’s evolved since then! It’s also mentioned in Macbeth, when the evil Lady Macbeth uses possets to knock out Duncan’s guards.

This recipe works on a similar principle – but instead of curdling the cream, the lemon acts to set it, creating a dense, smooth and creamy taste. You can add grated lemon zest to this, but I prefer to keep the smoothness of the cream totally uninterrupted by the nuggets of peel.

Lemon Posset

Ingredients

  • 600ml double cream
  • 140g caster sugar
  • Juice of 2 lemons (at least 75ml)

Method

  • Combine the cream and sugar in a pan, and heat until scalding – but do not boil.
  • Whilst on the heat, add the lemon juice and allow to boil for 30 seconds, whisking to prevent the cream from burning.
  • Allow to cool before pouring into bowls and placing in the fridge until set.

Some people like to serve this with shortbread or other crisp biscuits, but I really don’t think it needs any additions!